COVID Family With Smell Loss Dies In Gas Leak After Failing To Notice Odour

Story By: Feza Uzay, Sub-Editor: Marija Stojkoska, Agency:  Newsflash

A family who lost their sense of smell while suffering with COVID-19 has died of carbon monoxide poisoning after failing to notice the odour of a gas leak coming from a faulty boiler.

The incident took place in their flat in a two-storey building in the city of Shchelkovo near the Russian capital Moscow on 7th February.

When Igor Kruglov and his wife Lyudmila Kruglova, ages not disclosed, started feeling unwell and experiencing weakness and severe vomiting, they called for an ambulance.

@kruglova_mila/Newsflash

A medical team then arrived at the flat where the couple was found dead alongside their five-year-old son.

The woman’s 14-year-old daughter from her first marriage, Anna Kashevarova, was taken to hospital in serious condition and is now reportedly in a coma.

According to the news site Life, the gas leak occurred due to an improperly installed boiler two years ago and poor ventilation in the apartment.

@kruglova_mila/Newsflash

The family tested positive for COVID-19 a week prior and probably failed to notice the odour of leaking gas due to their loss of smell, a common symptom of the virus.

The authorities have initiated an investigation into the incident and pointed out that the gas company responsible for the building will also be probed.

The ViralTab page is created by and dedicated to professional, independent freelance journalists. It is a place for us to showcase our work. When our news is sold to our media partners, we will include the link here.

One thought on “COVID Family With Smell Loss Dies In Gas Leak After Failing To Notice Odour

  • March 3, 2021 at 9:50 am
    Permalink

    What a very tragic case. What a terrible loss. However, please be aware that carbon monoxide (CO) itself has no odour at all. Other products of combustion can be emitted along with the CO as we all know fumes can smell BUT it is very possible with CO from a gas boiler that there is no odour so this is why prevention is key plus a CO alarm to EN 50291. In the UK the gas emergency service cannot and doesn’t test the emissions from gas appliances for CO. Why not? Ofgem has told us that if HSE required Ofgem to find the funds for the gas emergency service to test gas appliances for CO, Ofgem would find the funds. Why doesn’t the HSE do this?

Comments are closed.